Trump Administration, Week 193: Friday, 25 September – Thursday, 1 October 2020 (Days 1,344-1,350)

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 25 September 2020, Day 1,344:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 25 September 2020: Under 10 Percent of Americans Have Covid-19 Antibodies, Study Finds, The New York Times, Friday, 25 September 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic for Friday, 25 September 2020: World Health Organization (WHO) warns 2 million deaths ‘not impossible’ as global fatalities approach 1 million, The Washington Post, Miriam Berger, Meryl Kornfield, Paulina Villegas, Brittany Shammas, Hannah Denham, Hannah Knowles, and Darren Sands, Friday, 25 September 2020: “With the world fast approaching 1 million deaths officially related to covid-19, a doubling of that number is ‘certainly unimaginable, but it’s not impossible,’ World Health Organization expert Mike Ryan said Friday at a news briefing. ‘If we look at losing 1 million people in nine months and then we just look at the realities of getting vaccines out there in the next nine months, it’s a big task for everyone involved,’ Ryan, the executive director of WHO’s health emergencies program, said.

Here are some of the significant developments included in this article:

Trump and the White House demand the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) justify tough standards for coronavirus vaccine, raising concerns of political interference, The Washington Post, Laurie McGinley, Yasmeen Abutaleb, and Josh Dawsey, Friday, 25 September 2020: “On the same day President Trump blasted the Food and Drug Administration’s plan for tougher standards for a coronavirus vaccine as a ‘political move,’ a top White House aide demanded detailed justifications from the agency in what some fear is an attempt to thwart or block the standards designed to boost public trust in a vaccine. The White House’s involvement appears to go beyond the perfunctory review that agency officials had expected, and is likely to reinforce public concerns that a vaccine may be rushed to benefit the president’s reelection campaign. Polls show that the number of people who say they’re willing to take a coronavirus vaccine if it were available today has nosedived from 72 percent in May to 50 percent as of early this month, according to Pew Research Center, largely because of concerns that politics, rather than science, is driving the process.”

Continue reading Week 193, Friday, 25 September – Thursday, 1 October 2020 (Days 1,344-1,350) Continue reading…

Trump Administration, Week 192: Friday, 18 September – Thursday, 24 September 2020 (Days 1,337-1,343)

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 18 September 2020, Day 1,337:

 

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Champion of Gender Equality, Dies at 87, NPR, Nina Totenberg, Friday, 18 September 2020: “Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the demure firebrand who in her 80s became a legal, cultural and feminist icon, died Friday. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas. The court, in a statement, said Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., surrounded by family. She was 87. ‘Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,’ Chief Justice John Roberts said. ‘We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tireless and resolute champion of justice.’ Architect of the legal fight for women’s rights in the 1970s, Ginsburg subsequently served 27 years on the nation’s highest court, becoming its most prominent member. Her death will inevitably set in motion what promises to be a nasty and tumultuous political battle over who will succeed her, and it thrusts the Supreme Court vacancy into the spotlight of the presidential campaign. Just days before her death, as her strength waned, Ginsburg dictated this statement to her granddaughter Clara Spera: ‘My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.'” See also, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court’s Feminist Icon, Is Dead at 87, The New York Times, Linda Greenhouse, Friday, 18 September 2020: “Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve on the Supreme Court and a pioneering advocate for women’s rights, who in her ninth decade became a much younger generation’s unlikely cultural icon, died on Friday at her home in Washington. She was 87. The cause was complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer, the Supreme Court said. By the time two small tumors were found in one of her lungs in December 2018, during a follow-up scan for broken ribs suffered in a recent fall, Justice Ginsburg had beaten colon cancer in 1999 and early-stage pancreatic cancer 10 years later. She received a coronary stent to clear a blocked artery in 2014.” See also, Justice Ginsburg’s Judicial Legacy of Striking Dissents. She was part of the Supreme Court’s 4-member liberal wing throughout her 27-year tenure and led it in her last decade. The New York Times, Adam Liptak, Friday, 18 September 2020: “There was a framed copy of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 on the wall of the chambers of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Friday. She counted the law among her proudest achievements, even as it illustrated her limited power. As part of the Supreme Court’s four-member liberal wing, she did her most memorable work in dissent. The law was a reaction to her minority opinion in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, the 2007 ruling that said Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 imposed strict time limits for bringing workplace discrimination suits. She called on Congress to overturn the decision, and it did. On the court, however, her notable victories were few. As she put it in a 2013 interview in her chambers, she was fully engaged in her work as the leader of the liberal opposition on what she called ‘one of the most activist courts in history.’ There were exceptions, of course. One of her favorite majority opinions, she often said, ruled that the Virginia Military Institute’s male-only admissions policy violated the Equal Protection clause.” See also, ‘A Titan of Justice’: Leaders React to Justice Ginsburg’s Death, The New York Times, Christopher Mele, Friday, 18 September 2020: Political leaders from both sides of the aisle and the chief justice of the United States offered tributes to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Friday, remembering her as a trailblazer and a warrior for justice. But their comments also reflected what is expected to be a bruising fight over her replacement.” See also, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court justice and legal pioneer for gender equality, dies at 87, The Washington Post, Robert Barnes and Michael A. Fletcher, Friday, 18 September 2020: “Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve on the high court and a legal pioneer for gender equality whose fierce opinions as a justice made her a hero to the left, died Sept. 18 at her home in Washington. She was 87. The death was announced in a statement by the U.S. Supreme Court. She had recently been treated for pancreatic cancer. Born in Depression-era Brooklyn, Justice Ginsburg excelled academically and went to the top of her law school class at a time when women were still called upon to justify taking a man’s place. She earned a reputation as the legal embodiment of the women’s liberation movement and as a widely admired role model for generations of female lawyers. Working in the 1970s with the American Civil Liberties Union, Justice Ginsburg successfully argued a series of cases before the high court that strategically chipped away at the legal wall of gender discrimination, eventually causing it to topple. Later, as a member of the court’s liberal bloc, she was a reliable vote to enhance the rights of women, protect affirmative action and minority voting rights and defend a woman’s right to choose an abortion.” See also, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Great Equalizer. How a scholar, advocate, and judge upended the entirety of U.S. political thought. The New Yorker, Jill Lepore, Friday, 18 September 2020: ” See also, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Vows Vote on Ginsburg Replacement as Her Death Upends the 2020 Race, The New York Times, Peter Baker and Maggie Haberman, Friday, 18 September 2020: “The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday instantly upended the nation’s politics in the middle of an already bitter campaign, giving President Trump an opportunity to try to install a third member of the Supreme Court with just weeks before an election that polls show he is currently losing. The White House had already made quiet preparations in the days before Justice Ginsburg’s death to advance a nominee without waiting for voters to decide whether to give Mr. Trump another four years. Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, vowed Friday night to hold a vote on a Trump nominee but would not say whether he would try to rush it through before the vote on Nov. 3 in what would surely be a titanic partisan battle. The sudden vacancy on the court abruptly transformed the presidential campaign and underscored the stakes of the contest between Mr. Trump and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., his Democratic challenger. It also bolstered Mr. Trump’s effort to shift the subject away from his handling of the coronavirus pandemic and remind Republicans why it matters whether he wins or not, while also potentially galvanizing Democrats who fear a change in the balance of power on the Supreme Court.” See also, McConnell vows Trump’s Supreme Court Nominee will get a Senate vote, The Washington Post, Seung Min Kim, Friday, 18 September 2020: “Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has made judicial confirmations a hallmark of his legacy, is now confronting an extremely fraught Supreme Court fight that will challenge his pledge to leave no vacancy behind amid charges of hypocrisy and as his party’s control of the Senate hangs in the balance. McConnell (R-Ky.), who blocked President Barack Obama’s final nominee to the Supreme Court for the near entirety of 2016, said Friday that President Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court will get a vote on the floor of the Senate, although he did not say when that vote would be held.” See also, Ginsburg’s death jolts chaotic presidential race as both sides prepare for Supreme Court battle, The Washington Post, Philip Rucker, Matt Viser, Sean Sullivan, and Robert Costa, Friday, 18 September 2020: “An already chaotic and corrosive presidential campaign was jolted anew Friday night by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, as a sudden vacancy on the Supreme Court just 46 days before the election immediately galvanized both political parties. The impending fight for the Supreme Court thrusts issues of civil rights, abortion rights and health care to the forefront of a campaign that had been centered on the coronavirus pandemic, the economy and race relations, and it could boost voter enthusiasm and turnout numbers. Democratic and Republican leaders assembled for all-out political war. Despite Ginsburg’s dying wish that her successor not be determined until after the election, White House officials said President Trump is preparing to nominate a replacement in the coming days. And Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said that nominee would receive a vote in the Republican-controlled Senate — a departure from McConnell’s refusal to consider a nominee chosen by President Barack Obama before the 2016 election. ‘President Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate,’ McConnell said in a statement. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden warned the Senate not to hold an election-year confirmation vote to fill Ginsburg’s seat. ‘Tonight and in the coming days we should focus on the loss of the justice and her enduring legacy. But there is no doubt — let me be clear — that the voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider,’ he told reporters in a hastily arranged appearance late Friday. Previewing the path ahead, Democratic vice-presidential nominee Kamala D. Harris said in a statement Friday: ‘Tonight we mourn, we honor, and we pray for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her family. Tomorrow we fight for her legacy.'”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Great Equalizer. How a scholar, advocate, and judge upended the entirety of U.S. political thought. The New Yorker, Jill Lepore, Friday, 18 September 2020: “The change [Ruth Bader] Ginsburg ushered into American politics began a half century ago, and reckoning with its magnitude requires measuring the distance between now and then. At the time, only three in a hundred legal professionals and fewer than two hundred of the nation’s ten thousand judges were women. In 1971, as Richard Nixon prepared to make two appointments to the Supreme Court, he faced a dilemma. Yet another Southerner he’d tapped had been nixed for an opposition to desegregation, so Nixon decided to look for someone who was, preferably, not a racist. He considered naming a woman. ‘I’m not for women, frankly, in any job,’ he told his aides, in a little fit of hysterics. ‘Thank God we don’t have any in the Cabinet.’ He didn’t think women should be educated, or ‘ever be allowed to vote, even.’ But, given the momentum of the women’s-rights movement, he conceded the political necessity of naming a woman to the bench: it might gain him a small but crucial number of votes in the upcoming election. ‘It’s like the Negro vote,’ he said. ‘It’s a hell of a thing.’ Then Chief Justice Warren Burger, in a similar huff, told Nixon that, if he were to nominate a woman, he’d resign. In the end, Nixon named Lewis Powell. While all these men were dithering, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was working for the A.C.L.U., writing the brief for a case set to go before the Court, Reed v. Reed. Decided on November 22, 1971, weeks after Powell’s confirmation hearings, Reed v. Reed upended a century of American jurisprudence and the entirety of political thought going back to the beginning of the Republic. Before 1971, as Ginsburg would later write, ‘Neither legislators nor judges regarded gender lines as “back of the bus” regulations. Rather, these rules were said to place women on a pedestal.’ Thomas Jefferson had taken the trouble to explain that women had no part in the Framers’ understanding of the government devised by the Constitution. ‘Were our state a pure democracy,’ he wrote, ‘there would yet be excluded from their deliberations . . . women; who, to prevent deprivation of morals, and ambiguity of issues, could not mix promiscuously in the public gatherings of men.’ Women were to be excluded for their own protection. The early women’s-rights movement, in the middle decades of the nineteenth century, had not defeated that argument, and the Fourteenth Amendment, ratified in 1868, did not explicitly—or implicitly, according to the Court—bar discrimination on the basis of sex. In 1873, ruling on a case in which Myra Bradwell had sued the state of Illinois for denying her the right to practice law, one Supreme Court Justice explained his logic this way: ‘The natural and proper timidity and delicacy which belongs to the female sex evidently unfits it for many of the occupations of civil life.’ That, as Ginsburg liked to say, was a cage, pretending to be a pedestal. Reed v. Reed, in 1971, involved an Idaho statute that gave preference to men—’males must be preferred to females’—in executing estates. The Court, following Ginsburg’s brief, ruled for the first time that discrimination on the basis of sex violated the equal-protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Writing for the majority, Burger used language that had been introduced by Ginsburg: ‘To give a mandatory preference to members of either sex over members of the other, merely to accomplish the elimination of hearings on the merits, is to make the very kind of arbitrary legislative choice forbidden by the equal-protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment; and whatever may be said as to the positive values of avoiding intrafamily controversy, the choice in this context may not lawfully be mandated solely on the basis of sex.’ Just a few years later, Ginsburg was arguing her own cases before the Court, and the Chief Justice was stumbling over how to address her. ‘Mrs. Bader? Mrs. Ginsburg?'”

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 18 September 2020: After Criticism, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Reverses Covid-19 Guidelines on Testing People Who Were Exposed, The New York Times, Friday, 18 September 2020:

Other significant developments are included in this article.

Continue reading Week 192, Friday, 18 September – Thursday, 24 September 2020 (Days 1,337-1,343)

Continue reading…

Trump Administration, Week 191: Friday, 11 September – Thursday, 17 September 2020 (Days 1,330-1,336)

 

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 11 September 2020, Day 1,330:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 11 September 2020: Dr. Anthony Fauci Warns the Coronavirus Could Disrupt Life Until ‘Maybe Even Toward the End of 2021,’ The New York Times, Friday, 11 September 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic on Friday, 11 September 2020: Dr. Anthony Fauci disagrees with Trump’s claim that the U.S. has ’rounded the final turn’ on coronavirus, The Washington Post, Kim Bellware, Meryl Kornfield, Derek Hawkins, Adam Taylor, Hamza Shaban, Darren Sands, and Hannah Knowles, Friday, 11 September 2020: “Top infectious-disease expert Anthony S. Fauci said Friday that he disagrees with President Trump’s claim that the United States has ’rounded the final turn’ of the coronavirus crisis, calling the country’s latest virus statistics ‘disturbing.’

Here are a few of the significant developments included in this article:

Election 2020 Updates: Court Ruling Deals Blow to Ex-Felons’ Voting Rights in Florida, The New York Times, Friday, 11 September 2020:

  • In a reversal, a federal appeals court says Florida felons must pay fines and fees before voting.

  • With 9/11 memorials transformed by the virus, Biden and Trump honor the dead.

  • A top aide assigned to scrutinize the Trump-Russia investigation resigns from the Justice Department.

  • The Department of Homeland Security, formed after 9/11, is accused of distorting intelligence to please Trump.

  • Some fast-growing militia groups are attracting veterans.

  • Senator Susan Collins of Maine, a vulnerable Republican, and Sara Gideon faced off in their first debate.

  • The Democratic challenger to a QAnon candidate in Georgia has dropped out.

Continue reading Week 191, Friday, 11 September – Thursday, 17  September 2020 (Days 1,330-1,336)

Continue reading...

Trump Administration, Week 190: Friday, 4 September – Thursday, 10 September 2020 (Days 1,323-1,329)

 

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 4 September 2020, Day 1,323:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 4 September 2020: Researchers Say Vaping Can Increase Coronavirus Hazards, The New York Times, Friday, 4 September 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic for Friday, 4 September 2020: Trump contradicts his administration’s chief scientific adviser on when a coronavirus vaccine could be ready, The Washington Post, Antonia Noori Farzan, Jennifer Hassan, Rick Noack, Lateshia Beachum, Hannah Denham, Derek Hawkins, Miriam Berger, Meryl Kornfield, and Marisa Iati, Friday, 4 September 2020: “President Trump on Friday asserted that a coronavirus vaccine would probably be available for distribution next month, contradicting his administration’s chief scientific adviser responsible for accelerating vaccine production. The discussion comes after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told all states and U.S. territories to be ready to provide a vaccine to health-care workers and other high-priority groups as early as Nov. 1, which prompted concern that the Food and Drug Administration was rushing to approve a vaccine before Election Day, Nov. 3, for political reasons. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar denied that the federal government’s Nov. 1 timeline for vaccine distribution is related to the presidential election two days later.

Here are a few of the significant developments in this article:

Trump Faces Uproar Over Reported Remarks Calling Fallen Soldiers ‘Losers’ and ‘Suckers.’ A report in The Atlantic said the president called troops killed in combat “losers” and “suckers.” He strenuously denied it, but some close to him said it was in keeping with other private comments he has made disparaging soldiers. The New York Times, Peter Baker and Maggie Haberman, Friday, 4 September 2020: “Trump confronted a political crisis on Friday that could undercut badly needed support in the military community for his re-election campaign as he sought to dispute a report that he privately referred to American soldiers killed in combat as ‘losers’ and ‘suckers.’ Mr. Trump, who has long portrayed himself as a champion of the armed forces and has boasted of rebuilding a military depleted after years of overseas wars, came under intense fire from Democrats and other opponents who said a report in The Atlantic demonstrated his actual contempt for those who serve their country in uniform. The president’s foes organized conference calls, blasted out statements, flocked to television studios and quickly posted advertising online calling attention to the reported comments. At a news conference, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., the Democratic presidential nominee, grew emotional as he said that his son Beau Biden, who died of brain cancer in 2015, ‘wasn’t a sucker’ for serving in the Army in Iraq. ‘How would you feel if you had a kid in Afghanistan right now?’ Mr. Biden said. ‘How would you feel if you lost a son, daughter, husband, wife? How would you feel, for real?’ Mr. Biden called the reported comments ‘disgusting,’ ‘sick,’ ‘deplorable,’ ‘un-American’ and ‘absolutely damnable,’ adding that he was closer to losing his temper than at any point during the campaign.” See also, Trump and Biden clash over military support after Trump’s alleged disparagement of fallen troops as ‘losers’ and ‘suckers.’ The Washington Post, David Nakamura, Josh Dawsey, and Rachael Bade, Friday, 4 September 2020: “The question of support for the nation’s military moved to the center of the campaign Friday as Democrat Joe Biden and President Trump clashed over allegations in a magazine article this week that the president had called dead American service members ‘suckers’ and ‘losers.’ Biden lambasted the president’s purported remarks as ‘disgusting’ and ‘un-American’ and accused him of having demonstrated ‘no loyalty to any cause but himself.’ He demanded that Trump apologize to the families of fallen troops. Trump denied the report and called it a ‘hoax.'”

Continue reading Week 190, Friday, 4 September – Thursday, 10 September 2020 (Days 1,323-1,329)

Continue reading...

Trump Administration, Week 189: Friday, 28 August – Thursday, 3 September 2020 (Days 1,316-1,322)

 

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 28 August 2020, Day 1,316:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 28 August 2020: California Moves Toward Easing Coronavirus Restrictions on Business, The New York Times, Friday, 28 August 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some Business Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 28 August 2020: Britain’s Central Bank Could Cut Rates Below Zero, Chief Says, The New York Times, Friday, 28 August 2020:

  • Bank of England chief says negative rates are possible in the U.K.

  • Workers will have to pay any deferred payroll taxes by April.

  • Dow erases 2020 losses as S&P 500 gains for a 7th day.

  • Investigators found $62 million in alleged P.P.P. fraud. They say there’s more.

  • The latest: MGM and Coca-Cola to cut jobs.

Other significant developments are included in this article.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic for Friday, 28 August 2020: First presumed U.S. case of coronavirus reinfection is reported in Nevada, The Washington Post, Antonia Noori Farzan, Rick Noack, Abigail Hauslohner, Lateshia Beachum, Derek Hawkins, Hannah Denham, Miriam Berger, Hannah Knowles, and Meryl Kornfield, Friday, 28 August 2020: “A 25-year-old Reno man is the first reported coronavirus patient to be reinfected in the United States, scientists say. Unlike the world’s first presumed case of reinfection in Hong Kong, this patient developed more severe symptoms when he got sick in late May after a mild case in April, according to the newly released study, which has not yet been peer-reviewed. Scientists with the medical school at the University of Nevada at Reno and the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory used advanced testing that sequenced the genetic strains, finding they were distinct between the infections.

Here are some significant developments:
  • The Secret Service is coping with coronavirus cases in the aftermath of President Trump’s insistence on traveling and holding campaign-style events amid the pandemic.
  • Groups representing nearly every public health department called Friday for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reverse ‘haphazard’ changes the agency recently made to its public testing advice.
  • The outbreak that swept through New York City this spring left a crippling financial crisis in its wake, and local leaders warn they may have to make huge cuts to government services unless the city can close a nearly $8 billion revenue gap.
  • The Food and Drug Administration’s chief spokeswoman, who has been in the job less than two weeks, was removed from her role as of noon Friday, part of continued fallout from a White House news conference featuring inaccurate claims that convalescent plasma dramatically reduced mortality for patients with covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.
  • MGM Resorts notified 18,000 furloughed workers — roughly one-fifth of its U.S. workforce — that their jobs have been cut for now, the casino giant confirmed.
  • The University of Notre Dame plans to resume in-person teaching next week after school officials determined that the threat of a wider outbreak of coronavirus cases in the campus community is receding. And the University of Virginia said it has resolved to teach undergraduates face to face after Labor Day.
  • The coronavirus death toll in the United States has surpassed 178,000, while more than 5.8 million cases have been reported.

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Continue reading Week 189, Friday, 28 August – Thursday, 3 September 2020 (Days 1,316-1,322)

Continue reading...

Trump Administration, Week 188: Friday, 21 August – Thursday, 27 August 2020 (Days 1,309-1,315)

March for Police Accountability, Williamstown, MA, Friday, 21 August 2020

 

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 21 August 2020, Day 1,309:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 21 August 2020: Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (C.D.C.) Suggests Some Child-Care Centers Can Reopen Safely, The New York Times, Friday, 21 August 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some Business Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 21 August 2020: With Lobster Deal, U.S. and E.U. Trade Talks Advance, The New York Times, Friday, 21 August 2020:

  • Theater chains announce moviegoing standards for the pandemic.

  • Facebook’s chief marketing officer plans to depart.

  • Amazon’s consumer boss Jeff Wilke will step down in 2021.

  • Turkey’s gas field discovery is good news for its economy — if it can produce.

  • U.S. stocks end record-breaking week with another small gain.

Other significant developments are included in this article.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic for Friday, 21 August 2020: More than 171,000 people have died from coronavirus in the U.S., The Washington Post, Lateshia Beachum, Derek Hawkins, Kim Bellware, Siobhán O’Grady, Hamza Shaban, Meryl Kornfield, and Paulina Firozi, Friday, 21 August 2020: “As Europe experiences a resurgence of coronavirus cases that appears to be driven primarily by young people, health authorities worry that crowded house parties could become super-spreader events for thousands of returning college students. On Thursday, Purdue University suspended 36 people who attended an off-campus party, officials at Syracuse University warned that a massive gathering ‘may have done damage enough to shut down campus,’ and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill switched to online learning amid an eruption of infections.

Here are some significant developments:
  • Vice President Pence said he ‘couldn’t be more proud’ of President Trump’s leadership during the coronavirus pandemic, and said during a ‘Good Morning America’ appearance that if Democratic nominee Joe Biden had been in charge, the losses — 171,000 dead and counting under the current administration — would have been worse.
  • Postmaster General Louis DeJoy told lawmakers Friday that ensuring the safe and timely delivery of election mail was his ‘sacred duty,’ disputing accusations his controversial cost-cutting agenda was politically motivated even as he reiterated his intention to execute it after the November election.
  • Californians are facing duel crises now, as wildfires, still raging largely out of control across a large swath of the state, force tens of thousands of people from their homes during a similarly uncontrolled pandemic.
  • The holiday shopping season is poised to begin earlier than ever — as soon as October — as retailers look to offset the disruptions the coronavirus pandemic has wrought on delivery times, in-person shopping and consumer spending power.
  • The Standard & Poor’s 500 index finished a trailblazing week by setting another record high, placing an exclamation point on a stunning turnaround in the face of an ongoing public health crisis.
  • At least 41 schools in Berlin have reported coronavirus cases among students or staff, less than two weeks after classes there fully resumed Aug. 10, officials confirmed to the Berliner Zeitung newspaper on Thursday.

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Continue reading Week 188, Friday, 21 August – Thursday, 27 August 2020 (Days 1,309-1,315)

Continue reading...

Trump Administration, Week 187: Friday, 14 August – Thursday, 20 August 2020 (Days 1,302-1,308)

 

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 14 August 2020, Day 1,302:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 14 August 2020: Firm Helping Run U.S. Coronavirus Database Refuses Senators’ Questions. People who recover from the virus have a three-month window of safety, C.D.C. guidance shows. The U.S. Postal Service warned several states that it may not be able to meet deadlines for delivering last-minute mail-in ballots. The New York Times, Friday, 14 August 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some Business Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 14 August 2020: Some Colleges Are Charging Students Coronavirus Testing Fees, The New York Times, Friday, 14 August 2020:

  • Some college students are being asked to share the costs of coronavirus testing.
  • Interest in a virtual entrepreneurship program for girls surges in the pandemic.
  • U.S. retail sales rose 1.2 percent in July.
  • Stock markets waver after retail data shows slower growth.
  • The Latest: Rent the Runway will not reopen its stores.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic for Friday, 14 August 2020: Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says people who recover from covid-19 don’t need to be retested for three months, The Washington Post, Miriam Berger, Lateshia Beachum, Kim Bellware, Hamza Shaban, Meryl Kornfield, and Hannah Knowles, Friday, 14 August 2020: “In recently updated guidance, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises that people who have recovered from the coronavirus do not need to quarantine or seek testing for three months after they have recuperated. The new recommendation, last updated Aug. 3, cautions that those who were previously infected should still socially distance and wear masks but says they don’t need to quarantine or be tested unless they develop symptoms.

Here are some significant developments:
  • Federal health officials are asking four states and one city — California, Florida, Minnesota, North Dakota and Philadelphia — to draft plans for how they would distribute a coronavirus vaccine when limited doses become available, possibly as early as this fall, officials said.
  • Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) offered rare Republican criticism of the Trump administration’s coronavirus response Friday, saying the federal government dismissed the virus’s threat and failed to take charge.
  • Nearly 41 percent of U.S. adults reported struggling with mental health or substance abuse, a new CDC survey revealed.
  • Cruise ships, early incubators of the coronavirus, are preparing to return to sea in the Mediterranean.
  • Coronavirus cases are surging in nursing homes again.
  • President Trump said he opposes both election aid for states and an emergency bailout for the U.S. Postal Service because he wants to limit how many Americans can vote by mail in November.
  • Several European countries, including Greece and Spain, enacted new restrictions in an effort to contain outbreaks without having to revert to major shutdowns.

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Continue reading Week 187, Friday, 14 August – Thursday, 20 August 2020 (Days 1,302-1,308)

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Trump Administration, Week 186: Friday, 7 August – Thursday, 13 August 2020 (Days 1,295-1,301)

 

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 7 August 2020, Day 1,295:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 7 August 2020: Trump Vows to Issue Executive Orders if Coronavirus Relief Talks Collapse, The New York Times, Friday, 7 August 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some Business Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 7 August 2020: U.S. Added 1.8 Million Jobs in July, The New York Times, Friday, 7 August 2020:

  • U.S. employers added 1.8 million jobs in July despite a coronavirus surge.
  • Wealthy families are throwing a lifeline to distressed businesses.
  • Canada outlines its response to the new U.S. aluminum tariff.
  • An expert on economic calamities sees ‘very, very dangerous territory.’
  • Wall Street is held back by China tensions and gridlock in Washington.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic on Friday, 7 August 2020: Coronavirus relief package talks stall; Trump might use executive actions to bypass Congress, The Washington Post, Brittany Shammas, Lateshia Beachum, Siobhán O’Grady, Kim Bellware, Hamza Shaban, Marisa Iati, and Meryl Kornfield, Thursday, 7 August 2020: “Talks regarding a coronavius relief package collapsed on Capitol Hill on Friday, and White House officials said they will recommend that President Trump move ahead without Congress to try and address unemployment benefits, eviction rules, and student loan relief. ‘The president would like us to make a deal, but unfortunately we did not make any progress today,’ Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said after he and White House chief of staff Mark Meadows met with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.). ‘At this point we are going to recommend to the president that over the weekend we move forward with some executive actions,’ Mnuchin said.

Here are some significant developments:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Continue reading Week 186, Friday, 7 August – Thursday, 13 August 2020 (Days 1,295-1,301)

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Trump Administration, Week 185: Friday, 31 July – Thursday, 6 August 2020 (Days 1,288-1,294)

 

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 31 July 2020, Day 1,288:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 31 July 2020: A $600-a-Week Lifeline for Unemployed Americans Expires After an Impasse in Washington, The New York Times, Friday, 31 July 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some Business Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 31 July 2020: U.S. Debt Outlook is Downgraded, The New York Times, Friday, 31 July 2020:

  • Fitch Ratings downgrades its outlook on U.S. debt.
  • Stocks climb as Big Tech rallies after strong earnings.
  • United will add international flights despite travel restrictions limiting U.S. visitors.
  • Europe’s contraction is its worst on record.
  • Economic snapshots: France, Germany, Italy and Spain.
  • Exxon reports a record loss and Chevron writes off Venezuela investments.

Other significant developments are included in this article.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic on Friday, 31 July 2020: U.S. deaths from coronavirus surpass 150,000, The Washington Post, Miriam Berger, Hannah Knowles, Derek Hawkins, Hannah Denham, Reis Thebault, and Meryl Kornfield. Friday, 31 July 2020: “The death toll in the United States from the novel coronavirus surpassed 150,000 on Friday, according to data gathered by The Washington Post, a milestone the country was never supposed to reach. While the disease continues to kill the oldest among us with impunity, other disturbing trends have surfaced. In recent weeks, Hispanics and Native Americans have made up an increasing proportion of deaths from covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Though the national fatality rate was on the decline for most of June, it began a steady rise in July, when the pandemic took a turn for the worse. States reported at least 24,833 coronavirus-related deaths in July, up more than 3,000 over the previous month, according to The Post’s tracking. The United States tallied 1,315 coronavirus deaths Friday, the fifth day in a row the country has reached a four-digit death toll. On Friday morning, three of the Trump administration’s top health officials were pressed by a Democratic-led House panel about the ongoing crisis. Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s leading expert on infectious diseases, told the panel that a ‘diversity of response’ from states had hampered efforts to bring down the number of new infections. In contrast, he said, many European nations went into near-total lockdowns.

Here are some significant developments:

  • Over the past week, 24 states surpassed a case increase of more than 100 cases per 100,000 people — a metric the White House and Deborah Birx, the coronavirus response coordinator, have defined as ‘red zone’ states, where the spread of the virus is serious enough to warrant stricter public health precautions.
  • The coronavirus recession threatens to devastate Black commercial districts and other ethnic enclaves that fuel the vibrancy, economies and identities of American cities.
  • A new CDC report suggests that children of all ages may be susceptible to coronavirus infections and may also spread it to others, and it details an outbreak at a sleep-away camp in Georgia last month in which 260 children and staffers — more than three-quarters of those tested — contracted the virus less than a week after spending time together in close quarters.
  • Students can return to college safely if they are tested for the coronavirus every two days, according to a JAMA study by researchers from the Yale School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital.
  • Minnesota Attorney General’s Office filed a lawsuit against a ranch claiming that its three-day rodeo event in July bucked social distancing orders, threatening to expose people to the coronavirus.

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Continue reading Week 185, Friday, 31 July – Thursday, 6 August 2020 (Days 1,288-1,294)

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Trump Administration, Week 184: Friday, 24 July – Thursday, 30 July 2020 (Days 1,281-1,287)

 

Passages in bold in the body of the texts below are usually my emphasis, though not always. This is an ongoing project, and I update the site frequently during the day. Because I try to stay focused on what has actually happened, I usually let the news ‘settle’ for a day or so before posting. I hope readers will peruse the articles in full for a better understanding of the issues and their context; our democracy and our future depend on citizens who can distinguish between facts and falsehoods and who are engaged in the political process.

 

For independent global news, visit Democracy Now!

 

For a newsletter about the history behind today’s politics, subscribe to Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter, Letters from an American.

 

Friday, 24 July 2020, Day 1,281:

 

Some Global Coronavirus Updates on Friday, 24 July 2020: 73,400 New Coronavirus Cases in the U.S., Nearing Single-Day Record, The New York Times, Friday, 24 July 2020:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Some Business Coronavirus Updates for Friday, 24 July 2020: Markets Fall Again as Poor Earnings Reports Continue, The New York Times, Friday, 24 July 2020:

  • Stocks fall and gold rallies as uncertainty ripples through Wall Street.
  • The partisan divide on the coronavirus goes beyond masks.
  • Nonprofits helping Americans through the pandemic are in jeopardy themselves.
  • Smithfield Foods defends its pandemic response: ‘Think this has been easy?’
  • Schlumberger, an oil services company, will cut 21,000 jobs.
  • Catch up: McDonald’s joins other major chains with mask mandates.

Some significant developments in the coronavirus pandemic on Friday, 24 July 2020: CDC says people with mild coronavirus cases still report health issues weeks after testing, The Washington Post, John Wagner, Herman Wong, Derek Hawkins, Hannah Denham, Meryl Kornfield, Marisa Iati, Hannah Knowles, and Jacqueline Dupree, Friday, 24 July 2020: “Coronavirus infections are taking a lasting toll on people, even among those who had cases that were not severe enough to seek hospital care. Many people with milder covid-19 symptoms continue to report health issues two to three weeks after testing, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study found that 35 percent of people who had covid-19 and were able to self-treat were not at their usual level of health two to three weeks after testing. For people ages 18 to 34 with no underlying health issues, 1 in 5 were still feeling ill weeks later. The United States reported more than 1,100 coronavirus-related deaths on Friday, the fourth day in a row that reported deaths have been above 1,000. It’s the first time since late May that there have been four consecutive days of coronavirus-related deaths above 1,000.

Here are some significant developments:

Many other significant developments are included in this article.

Continue reading Week 184, Friday, 24 July – Thursday, 30 July 2020 (Days 1,281-1,287)

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